SEO isn’t something you learn overnight. If you want to perform your own SEO, you need to educate yourself. I’ve spent almost fifteen years learning about SEO and I’m thankful I did because I feel each hour of learning has paid itself back over and over again. In general, though, focus on relevance above all else. It’s tempting to just shoot for the big, authoritative opportunities, but by doing so you run into a few issues. At its core, SEO is about user intent. Search engines, like Google, want to provide users with results that are relevant to their queries and offer the utmost value. Therefore, it’s no surprise that the best and most relevant pages are given higher positions on a search engine results page. Never Repeat to much your Keyword with Bold / Emphasis. It makes your article unreadable and hurt user experience.

User-generated content + communities

This sounds condescendingly obvious, but Google really dislikes what it calls ‘thin content’. Essentially, these are pages that offer little in way of value to your audience – and will usually come in the form of extremely short webpages comprising only a few sentences. Targeting a hungry crowd can offer lots of benefits to your online business. This is because they are searching for immediate solutions to their questions or problems. Local SEO is all about promoting your site at the exact moment potential customers are looking for your type of product, and in your area. It’s about appearing in the main search results or within the map listings when your audience uses a local search term, such as plumber in Manchester, or when a search engine can tell their location. WordPress is one of the best-loved platforms out there because it’s really intuitive and can be integrated into a custom CMS. Plus, it has plenty of handy plugins to help with blog optimisation, such as Yoast, which assesses the SEO-friendliness of a blog post and gives you actionable advice on how to improve it.

Time proven tips for better SEO rankings

Alt attributes are the text alternatives to your image which will appear if your image fails to load, or if the user is accessing your site with an assistive device such as a screenreader. Because web crawlers don’t have eyes, they’re also what search engines “see” instead of an image, making them important for both accessibility and SEO. With a good education, you can learn how to weave SEO best practices into your website. You can perform DIY SEO if you have the right education and you get yourself on the right path. The title tag gives information about the page and while it allows only 55-60 characters, the title tag must be descriptive and compelling enough not just to make search engines rank you well but also to make searchers click to read more. The targeted keyword must preferably be in the beginning itself. SEO is the process of driving traffic from the ‘organic’, and ‘paid’ sources to win the rat race of ranking on search engine result pages (SERPs).

The first choice should be backlinks

Offsite references, reviews, and social links play a role in how your content performs on search engines. Inbound links to your site are still important, and so is a logical sitemap with internal linking among pages. People have different search behaviours and of course languages based on their location so you need to adapt to these factors in order to rank on search engines. Google doesn ’t want a website owner to be able to artificially climb its SERPs. Rather, Google wants websites to climb the ranks only when they are genuinely valuable and popular with the audience. It wants to see natural, organic links that you haven’t paid for and it wants to see deep, relevant and interesting content. Gaz Hall, a Freelance SEO Consultant, commented: "A shallow, highly crawlable link structure is critical to getting all of your content indexed—follow good information architecture practices."

Do not optimise for irrelevant keyword searches.

There are other things that you can do to get contextual links, such as guest bloggingand mentioning other sites in your content (and letting them know about it). Google’s Search Console (previously known as Webmaster Tools) and Analytics are both incredibly valuable tools for optimising your site and monitoring its SEO success. Back in 2011, you could use blog commenting to get 200 backlinks and quickly skyrocket your rankings on search engines. But, in today’s algorithm for search engines, the focus is on quality over quantity. You can create content to target keyword phrases that are (informational searches) in the research or consideration funnel stage.