ou can optimize the entire technical side of your site and still find it lost on page two or more in Google. SEO isn’t a trick. It isn’t something your web developer can do for you. In the early days of SEO, you could get a site to rank fairly easily by buying a bunch of low-quality backlinks, keyword stuffing (including the same keyword on a page a bunch of times), or by buying a domain address (website name) that exactly matched the keyword you wanted to rank for. The readability of your content has to do with the simplicity of its language, the lack of grammatical or syntactical errors, and the sentence structure. Online readability tests allow you to learn the “reading age” someone needs to understand your content. An SEO writer must take the time to understand who your audience is, what is important to them, and what content would be useful and meaningful to them.

Use standard HTML markup as much as possible

If you are focused on a local market, it is also important to get connected with local businesses and organizations. Understanding your audience and the entire consumer journey so you can be visible at the moments when it matters most is mission critical now. With for instance the rise of voice search, longer keyphrases become more and more common. Using a long keyphrase five times in your 300-word-article will look so unnatural, that it’s not a good practice at all, where using a certain keyword five times might fit there. Unfortunately, Google doesn’t update their public facing PR anymore. Instead, you have to use tools like Ahrefs and Majestic to assess the strength of a domain.

Don't go overboard at the risk of being penalized for keyword stuffing

The best way to create content that converts is to use emotion in your copy and evoke a desire for what you’re offering. Don’t try and stuff keywords where they don’t belong. Yes, still focus on keywords, but your north star for everything you write should be the user. The seminal idea behind Google’s ranking technology makes it clear that inbound links are the primary vehicle by which Google discovers new pages and websites on the Internet, and they’re the primary way Google assesses the credibility of a given website. After crawling your site and collecting every bit of information possible, search engines index and organize their findings in databases (think of these as massive file folders). All of these databases make up what’s called The Index.

Has Google indexed you already?

If your site is new and is in a competitive niche with high DR scores, then your initial plan should be to build links directly to pages you want to rank. You need to produce quality content that provides valuable insight. Google has enhanced its algorithms to weed out low-quality pages from its index. Therefore, if you are not part of Google’s directory, search engines will not include you in their results. And you can imagine what that can mean for your website! On the Internet, people tend to scan text rather than read it from cover to cover. That’s why you should provide a clear structure of each piece of content. Use headlines, subheadings, bullets and bolds in the most relevant sections of your copy. We asked an SEO Specialist, Gaz Hall, for his thoughts on the matter: "Google’s Keyword Planner is a free tool that can help you with keyword research. The tool is actually designed for the Google AdWords advertising program, and aims to help marketers select suitable keywords for ad placements. But it can also help you with search engine optimization. "

Identify potential link partners

Use the keywords your audience is searching for. Search engines understand synonyms and similar terminology, so using related keywords in multiple pieces of content helps the bots know what topics your site covers. That said, focusing on keywords for each piece of content you publish still matters. Choosing a perfect focus keyword is not an exact science. You should aim for a combination of words that are used by a search audience. Aim for a focus keyword that is relatively high on volume and aim for one that will fit your audience. If you are putting content on your own site, try to keep things fairly uniform. This can help you start building your own following and establish your own voice. Of course, that shouldn’t stop you from doing something that has more of a “shock factor.” Something a little more controversial can draw in big crowds, which translates to a lot of clicks and comments. Create links on Q&A platforms. We all have questions, and we are all looking for answers. The best places to look for people that have questions are Quora and Yahoo Answers. Just as you would do with blog comments, always add value to the conversation and link only to good resources.