Social media platforms have all but taken over, and when it comes to SEO, they are a huge part of the strategy for any campaign. Learning more about your target audience isn’t what directly affects your content promotion efforts, but if you don’t spend time on it, then the foundation of your content marketing is going to be very weak and you won’t see significant improvement. Search engine optimization is often about making small modifications to parts of your website. When viewed individually, these changes might seem like incremental improvements, but when combined with other optimizations, they could have a noticeable impact on your site's user experience and performance in organic search results. Give your customers points toward free products. Be generous with the points, so it is easy for them to visualize cashing them in after a few orders. The points could be toward products or information, available only to those redeeming points, so customers feel special because they have access to those products. Another option is to throw in a freebie of some sort, with every order.

Avoid link directories that link to all sorts of sites

Even though links from Wikipedia are nofollow, there is speculation that Google’s algorithm still does take these links into account, at least to some extent. SEO allows you to capture demand when a searcher may not even be familiar with your brand name. So content marketing is one of the 3 main pieces to SEO, but has been around for longer than SEO because of things like Michelin Stars and Guiness Book of World Records, which were essentially ingenious examples of content marketing for the tire company and the beer company respectively. Both search engines and SEOs have the same goal: they want to provide searchers with the best resolution to their query.

Time proven tips for better SEO rankings

Old-school SEO focused on keywords. New-school SEO focuses on high click-through rates, “long clicks”, freshness, and amplification...which are all signals that users are successfully finding the answers they’re looking for in your content. SEO-friendly URLs may not be the batter in the SEO cake mix, but they can be the frosting. Having an SEO-friendly URL is easy when using a management system, such as WordPress. Buyer personas are semi-fictional, generalized representations of your ideal customers. They help you understand your potential customers better, making it easier to tailor your content to their real needs. Content needs to play a part in search engine strategy, too. The use of content on a website is powerful because it impacts search engine results while forming relationships with audiences.

Getting your content out there and shared generously

Getting your site to rank in Google can be a tough slog. It requires knowledge of current ranking factors, as well as the time and ability to optimize your content for those factors. In link analysis, search engines measure who is linking to a site or page and what they are saying about that site/page. Like titles, search engines typically give headings a higher priority. Clear headings that describe the content that follows make it easier for search engines to detect the major themes of your site. Gaz Hall, an SEO Expert from the UK, said: "When a search engine crawls your site, it moves slowly from one page to another by following the links on the page. As it does, it collects data about the content of your page."

PageRank of the page

By regularly auditing your – or your client’s – sites, you can get a good feel for what you still need to do to improve SEO. To best understand your backlink profile, it makes sense to look at a few top level KPI’s such as the referring domains and IP’s, the country from where the backlink is coming from, and the Top-Level-Domain. Online shops in particular often face the risk of generating duplicate content. For example, a product might be listed in several categories. If the URL is structured hierarchically, a product can be accessible under multiple URLs. One reliable way to solve this problem is by using a canonical tag. This shows Google which URL is the “original” one and which one is a copy. The Google bot then ignores the copies when crawling your website and only indexes the original URLs. Google has drawn conclusions about user-behavior in search, realizing that searches prefer to see a variety of media formats for a given search query.